Lucy Lawless

 
 


 

LUCY LAWLESS  Warrior Women Documentary
Role: Narrator / Presenter
Airdate: 2003 on Discovery Channel

Warrior Women:
Boudica

5. Warrior Women: Boudica - In 62 BC, most of England was under the thumb of the Romans. Queen Boudica was married to King Prasutagus of the semi-autonomous Iceni tribe in the east. When the king died, he bequeathed half his kingdom to his young wife and her two daughters, and half to Emperor Nero to appease Rome. Thinking they could intimidate the young woman into complete submission, the Romans promptly flogged Queen Boudica, raped her daughters and stole her lands. Boudica took up the sword, rallied her Iceni warriors and went on a rampage. 


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Review

Lucy Lawless beings us the story of Boudica: “the red headed queen who brought the Roman Empire in Britain to its knees.”  The ‘Warrior Women’ reversion of Boudica was so much more gentle and compassionate that the recently aired Alex Kingston version in the UK.

With tons more facts (most of which aren’t know by most) and an incredibly empathic host (our dear Lucy) this series cant help but shine. I already knew the story of Boudica, as many do, but what ‘Warrior Women’ does is bring obscure facts and details to the audience’s attention and not just repeat the same story again and again.

One fascinating thing I learnt from this episode was that when Boudica marched on London and killed 10,000 inhabitants the fire has left scorched earth four metres below London which archaeologists call ‘The Boudica Destruction Layer’.”

Lucy was her usual stunning self and much to my delight practised her swords again, this time demonstrating the effects of good armour. She attacked a man in various parts of the body to show how and why armour was used. For Xena fans I thought I would die of laughter when I saw Lucy nod her head in understanding when the name Caesar was mentioned, I couldn’t help but think ‘don’t smile you hate the guy Xena….opps Lucy’.

The best part of the episode…. NO the entire series was Lucy’s face paint (lmao).

Seriously listening to the expert’s explanation of the blue war paint Lucy
allowed herself to have a small tattoo painted onto her forehead, after it
had been done Lucy asked out of curiosity what was in the dye, the expert replied ‘semen’. Lucy’s face comically dropped, her eyes narrowed and she managed to choke out ‘pardon?!’ The scene then cut and suddenly we see Lucy – with her face covered in this blue dye. Sounded very excited she gushes ‘that not only does it make you look good, it makes you feel funky’ LMAO

Lucy remarked that if Boudica had actually won her war things might be very different today. The Romans probably would never have attacked the UK again and therefore many other wars would have been prevented, if Boudica had won many countries could be speaking Celtic now. With her face covered in her blue face paint Lucy jokes ‘and you too could be looking this good’.

Well all good things must come to an end, and this episode unfortunately marks the end of ‘Warrior Women’. I loved this series and truly enjoyed the stories from France, Ireland, Britain, China, and the United States. Boudica was a fantastic end to an amazing series, I will really miss watching Lucy on Wednesday and learning about some incredible warrior women… thanks Lucy,

it’s been a blast.

-Grace Halden